|||

leadership

All sections →
 → Amrute joins the institute’s leadership at the culmination of a strategic planning process to strengthen Data & Society’s unique dual focus on convention-challenging research and targeted field engagement Dec 7, 2018 highlights & leadership & society Amrute joins the institute’s leadership at the culmination of a strategic planning process to strengthen Data & Society’s unique dual focus on convention-challenging research and targeted field engagement. As Director of Research, Amrute will mentor Data & Society’s growing research team and determine pathways for critical engagement with interlocutor and collaborator networks.
“Sareeta brings exciting new talent to Data & Society,” enthused Data & Society Founder and President danah boyd. “Sareeta has extensive experience as a rigorous empirical scholar examining the complex ways in which technology and society intertwine. Through her leadership and mentorship, we can help grow the field of scholars whose insights can help address some of society’s greatest challenges.”
Amrute will work closely with boyd to continue to hone a broader vision for new knowledge that helps decision-makers grapple with complex societal challenges arising around data and automation. — https://datasociety.net/blog/2018/12/05/data-society-welcomes-sareeta-amrute/
 → American leaders have always been mythologized; throughout the country’s history, there’s been a concerted effort by supporters to whitewash political leaders — presidents especially — and minimize the worst actions they took in the course of their stewardship of the country Oct 27, 2018 highlights & leadership & people American leaders have always been mythologized; throughout the country’s history, there’s been a concerted effort by supporters to whitewash political leaders — presidents especially — and minimize the worst actions they took in the course of their stewardship of the country.
This goes back as far as George Washington, who is lionized more for winning the Revolutionary War than for his ownership of human beings, and Franklin Delano Roosevelt, whose leadership through the Second World War overshadows his creation of internment camps for Japanese people living in America. Today, George W. Bush, the architect of the disastrous wars in Afghanistan and Iraq which claimed the lives of millions of innocent people, is a jolly, elderly painter. On social media, he’s retweeted by liberals when he poses for pictures with Michelle Obama. — https://www.theverge.com/2018/10/26/18029700/cesar-sayoc-democrat-bombs-trump-tank-meme-joke
 → Dorsey’s leadership style fosters caution, according to about a dozen people who’ve worked with him Aug 17, 2018 highlights & leadership Dorsey’s leadership style fosters caution, according to about a dozen people who’ve worked with him. He encourages debate among his employees and waits — and waits — for a consensus emerge. As a result, ideas are often debated “ad nauseum” and fail to come to fruition. “They need leadership that can make tough decisions and keep the ball rolling,” says a former employee who left last year. “There are a lot of times when Jack will instead wring his hands and punt on a decision that needs to be made quickly.”
This view closely tracks my own discussions with current and former employees. They’ve described for me the regular hack weeks that take place at Twitter, in which employees mock up a variety of useful new features, almost none of which ever ship in the core product. — https://www.theverge.com/2018/8/17/17706256/twitter-alex-jones-third-party-apps-hard-decisions
 → Dorsey’s leadership style fosters caution, according to about a dozen people who’ve worked with him Aug 17, 2018 highlights & leadership Dorsey’s leadership style fosters caution, according to about a dozen people who’ve worked with him. He encourages debate among his employees and waits — and waits — for a consensus emerge. As a result, ideas are often debated “ad nauseum” and fail to come to fruition. “They need leadership that can make tough decisions and keep the ball rolling,” says a former employee who left last year. “There are a lot of times when Jack will instead wring his hands and punt on a decision that needs to be made quickly.” — https://www.theverge.com/2018/8/17/17706256/twitter-alex-jones-third-party-apps-hard-decisions
Multiple scales. Jul 9, 2017 tech, design & leadership Move between scales freely. Maybe this is a design problem, not a testing problem. Maybe it is a people problem, not a technology ▵
Leadership is… Feb 7, 2017 systems sketching, systemics & leadership Lessons learned from Memorial Student Leadership Conference (MSLC) 2017. These thoughts were spurred by Director of Student Life Dr. Jennie Massey’s ▵
The National Youth Leadership & Innovation Summit Apr 28, 2016 articles, leadership, innovation & systems On April 29 & 30, ~300 Canadian youth and youth-serving leaders will convene at MaRS Discovery District in Toronto to explore a strategy for ▵
Don’t build a start-up, become a systems entrepreneur - Social Innovation Generation Jan 18, 2016 systems, leadership, social & innovation
Tony on AcdB Jan 17, 2016 leadership
athenahealthVoice: What Doctors Aren’t Learning In Medical School And Why It Matters Aug 18, 2015 education & leadership
The 5 Essential Skills of a Successful Project Manager Aug 1, 2015 leadership
The End of Leadership Jul 23, 2015 leadership, systems & futures
 → http://pic. Jul 5, 2015 leadership & highlights Big thanks to @madamepeddle & Beaconsfield J. High to have us share some Advocacy knowledge with their cool Gr. 9ers http://pic.twitter.com/XIo8Uhs1gq

via http://twitter.com/Radhoc/status/606922855146778624.

Go team!

 → http://pic. Jul 5, 2015 leadership & social & education & highlights @Radhoc learning about leadership and advocacy in the world. @madamepeddle #schum http://pic.twitter.com/oZTou3VzdY

via http://twitter.com/HillierNicholas/status/606789513445318656.

\m/
On Ice Buckets! Aug 29, 2014 leadership, social, futures & articles I participated in the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge because it really seemed like Alison wanted to pour a bunch of ice water on my head (turns out that ▵
 → memorialleadership: Feb 9, 2013 highlights & articles & leadership

memorialleadership:

(This is one of the little moments that I hope the future will remember us for.)

Hidden” leadership: Canadian Astronaut Chris Hadfield

Col. Hadfield’s musical collaboration with Ed Robertson (of the Barenaked Ladies) and the Wexford Gleeks” premiered today, marking the first time such an event has happened. What’s so special about it? Well, Colonel Hadfield is at least 420.5 kilometres above us, orbiting at a velocity of about 7.7 kilometres per second in the International Space Station. Music is not often made that far from Earth!

I wanted to take the occasion to profile Colonel Hadfield in the context of global leadership.

You might think that this is an odd association to make. Surely, he’s an impressive person - he is in orbit, after all. But he’s not leading a global organization and he isn’t making world-changing influential decisions. Is this leadership?

First, full disclosure: I’m a sucker for space. Humanity literally reaching for the stars inspires me more than anything. So, there’s that. But I’d also like to highlight three things that the soon-to-be Commander has done in his current position that make him out to be an exemplary role model of global leadership.

1. One of the most intrusive — and yet, unnoticed — factors of globalization is the sudden accessibility of media. The social tools of the internet have granted us the ability to communicate with each other more easily than ever. This is an opportunity the Colonel hasn’t missed: with 330,000 Twitter followers, he posts updates about four times a day — frequently including beautiful, high-quality photos taken from his perspective on the ISS. Many of these photos are of specific places, all around the globe. Suddenly, Col. Hadfield’s daytime hobby of photography is connecting people worldwide to the Earth’s landscapes, weather, and cities. We are proud when something of ours” is posted - and we are in admiration when the place is someone else’s. This simple little action is connecting people everywhere. Moreover, it sometimes has a direct purpose: his photo of Syria on January 2nd, 2013, caught press attention, simply from his observation of how peaceful it looked from up above.Syria from Space

Col. Hadfield’s photo of Syria on January 2nd, 2013, caught press attention, simply from his observation of how peaceful it looked from up above.

2. Colonel Hadfield is incredibly humble. This is one character trait that is obvious when watching the video of I.S.S. (Is Somebody Singing?)”, but it shows in his interviews and through his social media, too. He has called the opportunity to live in the ISS an incredible privilege, and that concept resonates through every message he sends back to Earth. Finally, he’s constantly engaging with us on our level; consider his joy at the NHLs lockout ending (because he could cheer for the Leafs) or his recent interview with William Shatner. In many ways, he is every bit as geeky and dorky as we can be, and his humility enables him to be relentlessly relatable. This inspires, I think, a connection to anyone who wants to feel connected.

But the key to a good crew like this … is to constantly check their objectives and necessities slightly ahead of my own. To do something nice for every other person on board at least once a day — and keep those things in mind, and recognize when you’re getting a little tired and a little frayed.”

3. This third point ties (1) and (2) together. Col. Hadfield seems to have an innate ability to understand people. He is attuned to his team and puts their needs above his own. Before launching on December 19th, he packed many small things” in care packages so that he would have gifts to give his crewmates on bad days. He did an Ask Me Anything” on reddit.com before launching in December. His regular photo updates always include comments or descriptions that present his own ideas of what he’s seeing. This third trait, I think, is just another example of how Col. Hadfield has an astronomical ability to connect people — and to connect to them himself — from all over the world.

And all this despite being 420.5 kilometers above the surface.

Col. Chris Hadfield helps us see that leadership isn’t always what it looks like: it doesn’t take a podium or an institution. He has a vision to inspire global awareness from his little station in the sky, and he isn’t wasting a minute in making it happen.

If you’d like to follow Col. Hadfield’s adventures, like him on Facebook or follow him on Twitter.

  -Ryan Murphy

Notes from Remzi Cej’s talk at MSLC 2013 Jan 26, 2013 leadership & articles “Leaderless Leadership: Leading in the 21st century” Fish and birds choose their leaders, just like us! … except they don’t wait an electoral ▵
If you’re not making any mistakes, you’re making a mistake. Jan 9, 2013 leadership — Miles Davis, as quoted by Frank Barrett, author of Yes to the Mess ▵
Defining “Global Leadership” Jul 3, 2012 leadership & articles Thus far (in life as well as in the context of my current work), I think I’ve been imagining the concepts of “global” and “leadership” as separate ▵
“Attention Density” and Behaviour Change - the “moment of insight” Jun 29, 2012 leadership & articles This article reflects similar readings I’ve completed that discuss the psychological and particularly the neurological context of attention and ▵
Notes from a TEDtalk - Ian Goldin: Navigating our global future Jun 21, 2012 leadership, futures, innovation, systems & articles In a short but rapid-pace talk, Ian Goldin stakes the claim that this century could be humanity’s greatest ever — or our worst. Goldin outlines the ▵
Summarizing the Centre for Creative Leadership’s 2011-2012 Annual Report Jun 20, 2012 leadership & articles The report focuses on five “big ideas” that the CCL is excited about in the sector of leadership development, which are: The role of neuroscience ▵